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Takeda to Present Data During 60th American Society of Hematology Annual Meeting on Wide Array of Treatment Needs for Blood Cancers

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Takeda Pharmaceutical Company Limited (TSE: 4502) today announced that it will present a total of 18 company-sponsored abstracts at the 60th American Society of Hematology (ASH) Annual Meeting taking place in San Diego from December 1 to 4, 2018. Takeda’s presentations will feature new data from clinical studies across the company’s hematology portfolio. Notably, Takeda will present data from the Phase 3 TOURMALINE-MM3 and ECHELON-2 clinical trials.

“With the presentation of data from two Phase 3 clinical trials as well as our pipeline, Takeda continues to grow the body of evidence for new therapeutic options that improve the way in which we treat blood cancer patients,” said Christophe Bianchi, M.D., President, Takeda Global Oncology Business Unit. “Positive data from the TOURMALINE-MM3 trial, the first and only Phase 3 placebo-controlled study evaluating a proteasome inhibitor in this setting, showed that using NINLARO as a post-autologous stem cell transplant maintenance treatment improved progression-free survival over the control arm, highlighting NINLARO’s potential use as a maintenance therapy in a patient population where there are currently limited options. Additionally, the positive data from the ECHELON-2 trial demonstrated that in patients with previously untreated CD30-positive peripheral T-cell lymphoma, ADCETRIS in combination with chemotherapy was superior to the control arm for progression-free survival and overall survival, representing an important milestone for ADCETRIS as a potential therapy in this setting where standard of care has not changed in several decades.”

At this year’s ASH meeting, data from the Phase 3 TOURMALINE-MM3 trial, evaluating the effect of NINLARO (ixazomib) as a maintenance therapy in adult patients diagnosed with multiple myeloma who responded to high-dose therapy (HDT) and autologous stem cell transplant (ASCT), will be presented for the first time during an oral session on Sunday, December 2 at 7:30 a.m. PT. The TOURMALINE-MM3 trial achieved its primary endpoint with NINLARO resulting in a statistically significant improvement in progression-free survival (PFS) versus placebo as assessed by an Independent Review Committee (IRC). No new safety signals were found in TOURMALINE-MM3 and the safety profile of NINLARO in the maintenance setting is consistent with previously reported results of single-agent NINLARO use. NINLARO is not currently approved for use as a single-agent in the post-ASCT maintenance setting.

Data from the Phase 3 ECHELON-2 trial will be presented during an oral session on Monday, December 3 at 6:15 p.m. PT. The trial demonstrated a statistically significant improvement in PFS of ADCETRIS (brentuximab vedotin) in combination with CHP (cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, prednisone) versus the control arm, CHOP (cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, vincristine, prednisone). Topline data from ECHELON-2 was reported in October 2018. Results from the trial demonstrated that combination treatment with ADCETRIS plus CHP was superior to the control arm for PFS as assessed by an Independent Review Facility (IRF; hazard ratio=0.71; p-value=0.0110). All key secondary endpoints, including overall survival, were statistically significant in favor of the ADCETRIS plus CHP arm, along with the manageable safety profile. ADCETRIS is currently not approved for the frontline treatment of PTCL.

The breadth and depth of Takeda’s research and development will be further showcased throughout several presentations focused on multiple myeloma, lymphoma, chronic myeloid leukemia and myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS).

18 Takeda Oncology-sponsored abstracts were accepted for presentation during ASH 2018, including:

Note: All times listed are in Pacific Standard Time

ADCETRIS (brentuximab vedotin)

Multiple Myeloma/NINLARO (ixazomib)

ICLUSIG® (ponatinib)

Pipeline (Lymphoma, Multiple Myeloma, Myelodysplastic Syndromes)

For more information, the ASH program is available here: https://ash.confex.com/ash/2018/webprogram/

About ADCETRIS
ADCETRIS is an ADC comprising an anti-CD30 monoclonal antibody attached by a protease-cleavable linker to a microtubule disrupting agent, monomethyl auristatin E (MMAE), utilizing Seattle Genetics’ proprietary technology. The ADC employs a linker system that is designed to be stable in the bloodstream but to release MMAE upon internalization into CD30-positive tumor cells.

ADCETRIS injection for intravenous infusion has received FDA approval for five indications in adult patients with: (1) previously untreated Stage III or IV classical Hodgkin lymphoma (cHL), in combination with chemotherapy, (2) cHL at high risk of relapse or progression as post-autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (auto-HSCT) consolidation, (3) cHL after failure of auto-HSCT or failure of at least two prior multi-agent chemotherapy regimens in patients who are not auto-HSCT candidates, (4) sALCL after failure of at least one prior multi-agent chemotherapy regimen, and (5) primary cutaneous anaplastic large cell lymphoma (pcALCL) or CD30-expressing mycosis fungoides (MF) who have received prior systemic therapy.

Health Canada granted ADCETRIS approval with conditions for relapsed or refractory Hodgkin lymphoma and sALCL in 2013, and non-conditional approval for post-autologous stem cell transplant (ASCT) consolidation treatment of Hodgkin lymphoma patients at increased risk of relapse or progression.

ADCETRIS received conditional marketing authorization from the European Commission in October 2012. The approved indications in Europe are: (1) for the treatment of adult patients with relapsed or refractory CD30-positive Hodgkin lymphoma following ASCT, or following at least two prior therapies when ASCT or multi-agent chemotherapy is not a treatment option, (2) the treatment of adult patients with relapsed or refractory sALCL, (3) for the treatment of adult patients with CD30-positive Hodgkin lymphoma at increased risk of relapse or progression following ASCT, and (4) for the treatment of adult patients with CD30-positive cutaneous T-cell lymphoma (CTCL) after at least one prior systemic therapy.

ADCETRIS has received marketing authorization by regulatory authorities in more than 70 countries for relapsed or refractory Hodgkin lymphoma and sALCL. See important safety information below.

ADCETRIS is being evaluated broadly in more than 70 clinical trials, including a Phase 3 study in first-line Hodgkin lymphoma (ECHELON-1) and another Phase 3 study in first-line CD30-positive peripheral T-cell lymphomas (ECHELON-2), as well as trials in many additional types of CD30-positive malignancies.

Seattle Genetics and Takeda are jointly developing ADCETRIS. Under the terms of the collaboration agreement, Seattle Genetics has U.S. and Canadian commercialization rights and Takeda has rights to commercialize ADCETRIS in the rest of the world. Seattle Genetics and Takeda are funding joint development costs for ADCETRIS on a 50:50 basis, except in Japan where Takeda is solely responsible for development costs.

ADCETRIS (brentuximab vedotin) Important Safety Information (European Union)

Please refer to Summary of Product Characteristics (SmPC) before prescribing.

CONTRAINDICATIONS

ADCETRIS is contraindicated for patients with hypersensitivity to brentuximab vedotin and its excipients. In addition, combined use of ADCETRIS with bleomycin causes pulmonary toxicity.

SPECIAL WARNINGS & PRECAUTIONS

Progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (PML): John Cunningham virus (JCV) reactivation resulting in progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (PML) and death can occur in patients treated with ADCETRIS. PML has been reported in patients who received ADCETRIS after receiving multiple prior chemotherapy regimens. PML is a rare demyelinating disease of the central nervous system that results from reactivation of latent JCV and is often fatal.

Closely monitor patients for new or worsening neurological, cognitive, or behavioral signs or symptoms, which may be suggestive of PML. Suggested evaluation of PML includes neurology consultation, gadolinium-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging of the brain, and cerebrospinal fluid analysis for JCV DNA by polymerase chain reaction or a brain biopsy with evidence of JCV. A negative JCV PCR does not exclude PML. Additional follow up and evaluation may be warranted if no alternative diagnosis can be established Hold dosing for any suspected case of PML and permanently discontinue ADCETRIS if a diagnosis of PML is confirmed.

Be alert to PML symptoms that the patient may not notice (e.g., cognitive, neurological, or psychiatric symptoms).

Pancreatitis: Acute pancreatitis has been observed in patients treated with ADCETRIS. Fatal outcomes have been reported. Closely monitor patients for new or worsening abdominal pain, which may be suggestive of acute pancreatitis. Patient evaluation may include physical examination, laboratory evaluation for serum amylase and serum lipase, and abdominal imaging, such as ultrasound and other appropriate diagnostic measures. Hold ADCETRIS for any suspected case of acute pancreatitis. ADCETRIS should be discontinued if a diagnosis of acute pancreatitis is confirmed.

Pulmonary Toxicity: Cases of pulmonary toxicity, some with fatal outcomes, including pneumonitis, interstitial lung disease, and acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), have been reported in patients receiving ADCETRIS. Although a causal association with ADCETRIS has not been established, the risk of pulmonary toxicity cannot be ruled out. Promptly evaluate and treat new or worsening pulmonary symptoms appropriately. Consider holding dosing during evaluation and until symptomatic improvement.

Serious infections and opportunistic infections: Serious infections such as pneumonia, staphylococcal bacteremia, sepsis/septic shock (including fatal outcomes), and herpes zoster, and opportunistic infections such as Pneumocystis jiroveci pneumonia and oral candidiasis have been reported in patients treated with ADCETRIS. Carefully monitor patients during treatment for emergence of possible serious and opportunistic infections.

Infusion-related reactions (IRR): Immediate and delayed IRR, as well as anaphylaxis, have occurred with ADCETRIS. Carefully monitor patients during and after an infusion. If anaphylaxis occurs, immediately and permanently discontinue administration of ADCETRIS Appropriate medical therapy should be administered. If an IRR occurs, interrupt the infusion and institute appropriate medical management. The infusion may be restarted at a slower rate after symptom resolution. Patients who have experienced a prior IRR should be premedicated for subsequent infusions. IRRs are more frequent and more severe in patients with antibodies to ADCETRIS.

Tumor lysis syndrome (TLS): TLS has been reported with ADCETRIS. Patients with rapidly proliferating tumor and high tumor burden are at risk of TLS. Monitor these patients closely and managed according to best medical practice.

Peripheral neuropathy (PN): ADCETRIS treatment may cause PN, both sensory and motor. ADCETRIS-induced PN is typically cumulative and reversible in most cases. Monitor patients for symptoms of PN, such as hypoesthesia, hyperesthesia, paresthesia, discomfort, a burning sensation, neuropathic pain, or weakness. Patients experiencing new or worsening PN may require a delay and a dose reduction or discontinuation of ADCETRIS.

Hematological toxicities: Grade 3 or Grade 4 anemia, thrombocytopenia, and prolonged (equal to or greater than one week) Grade 3 or Grade 4 neutropenia can occur with ADCETRIS. Monitor complete blood counts prior to administration of each dose.

Febrile neutropenia: Febrile neutropenia has been reported. Closely monitor patients for fever and manage according to best medical practice if febrile neutropenia develops.

Stevens-Johnson syndrome (SJS): SJS and toxic epidermal necrolysis (TEN) have been reported with ADCETRIS. Fatal outcomes have been reported. Discontinue treatment with ADCETRIS if SJS or TEN occurs and administer appropriate medical therapy.

Gastrointestinal (GI) Complications: GI complications, some with fatal outcomes, including intestinal obstruction, ileus, enterocolitis, neutropenic colitis, erosion, ulcer, perforation and haemorraghe, have been reported. Promptly evaluate and treat patients if new or worsening GI symptoms occur.

Hepatotoxicity: Elevations in alanine aminotransferase (ALT) and aspartate aminotransferase (AST) have been reported. Serious cases of hepatotoxicity, including fatal outcomes, have also occurred. Test liver function prior to treatment initiation and routinely monitor patients receiving ADCETRIS for liver elevations. Patients experiencing hepatotoxicity may require a delay, dose modification, or discontinuation of ADCETRIS.

Hyperglycemia: Hyperglycemia has been reported during trials in patients with an elevated body mass index (BMI) with or without a history of diabetes mellitus. Closely monitor serum glucose for patients who experiences an event of hyperglycemia. Administer anti-diabetic treatment as appropriate.

Renal and Hepatic Impairment: There is limited experience in patients with renal and hepatic impairment. Available data indicate that MMAE clearance might be affected by severe renal impairment, hepatic impairment, and by low serum albumin concentrations.

CD30+ CTCL: The size of the treatment effect in CD30 + CTCL subtypes other than mycosis fungoides (MF) and primary cutaneous anaplastic large cell lymphoma (pcALCL) is not clear due to lack of high level evidence. In two single arm phase II studies of ADCETRIS, disease activity has been shown in the subtypes Sézary syndrome (SS), lymphomatoid papulosis (LyP) and mixed CTCL histology. These data suggest that efficacy and safety can be extrapolated to other CTCL CD30+ subtypes. Carefully consider the benefit-risk per patient and use caution in other CD30+ CTCL patient types.

Sodium content in excipients: ADCETRIS contains a maximum of 2.1 mmol (or 47 mg) of sodium per dose. Take this into consideration for patients on a controlled sodium diet.

INTERACTIONS
Patients who are receiving a strong CYP3A4 and P-gp inhibitor, concomitantly with ADCETRIS may have an increased risk of neutropenia and should be closely monitored. Co-administration of ADCETRIS with a CYP3A4 inducer did not alter the plasma exposure of ADCETRIS but it appeared to reduce plasma concentrations of MMAE metabolites that could be assayed. ADCETRIS is not expected to alter the exposure to drugs that are metabolized by CYP3A4 enzymes.

PREGNANCY: Advise women of childbearing potential to use two methods of effective contraception during treatment with ADCETRIS and until 6 months after treatment. There are no data from the use of ADCETRIS in pregnant women, although studies in animals have shown reproductive toxicity. Do not use ADCETRIS during pregnancy unless the benefit to the mother outweighs the potential risks to the fetus.

LACTATION (breast-feeding): There are no data as to whether ADCETRIS or its metabolites are excreted in human milk, therefore a risk to the newborn/infant cannot be excluded. With the potential risk, a decision should be made whether to discontinue breast-feeding or discontinue/abstain from therapy with ADCETRIS.

FERTILITY: In nonclinical studies, ADCETRIS treatment has resulted in testicular toxicity, and may alter male fertility. Advise men being treated with ADCETRIS not to father a child during treatment and for up to 6 months following the last dose.

Effects on ability to drive and use machines: ADCETRIS may have a minor influence on the ability to drive and use machines.

UNDESIRABLE EFFECTS
The most frequent adverse reactions (≥10%) were infections, peripheral sensory neuropathy, nausea, fatigue, diarrhoea, pyrexia, upper respiratory tract infection, neutropenia, rash, cough, vomiting, arthralgia, peripheral motor neuropathy, infusion-related reactions, pruritus, constipation, dyspnoea, weight decreased, myalgia and abdominal pain.

Serious adverse drug reactions were: pneumonia, acute respiratory distress syndrome, headache, neutropenia, thrombocytopenia, constipation, diarrhea, vomiting, nausea, pyrexia, peripheral motor neuropathy, peripheral sensory neuropathy, hyperglycemia, demyelinating polyneuropathy, tumor lysis syndrome, and Stevens-Johnson syndrome. Serious adverse drug reactions occurred in 12% of patients. The frequency of unique serious adverse drug reactions was ≤1%.

ADCETRIS (brentuximab vedotin) U.S. Important Safety Information

BOXED WARNING: PROGRESSIVE MULTIFOCAL LEUKOENCEPHALOPATHY (PML)

JC virus infection resulting in PML and death can occur in ADCETRIS-treated patients.

Contraindication
ADCETRIS concomitant with bleomycin due to pulmonary toxicity (e.g., interstitial infiltration and/or inflammation).

Warnings and Precautions

Peripheral neuropathy (PN): ADCETRIS causes PN that is predominantly sensory. Cases of motor PN have also been reported. ADCETRIS-induced PN is cumulative. Monitor for symptoms such as hypoesthesia, hyperesthesia, paresthesia, discomfort, a burning sensation, neuropathic pain, or weakness. Institute dose modifications accordingly.

Anaphylaxis and infusion reactions: Infusion-related reactions (IRR), including anaphylaxis have occurred with ADCETRIS. Monitor patients during infusion. If an IRR occurs, interrupt the infusion and institute appropriate medical management. If anaphylaxis occurs, immediately and permanently discontinue the infusion and administer appropriate medical therapy. Premedicate patients with a prior IRR before subsequent infusions. Premedication may include acetaminophen, an antihistamine, and a corticosteroid.

Hematologic toxicities: Prolonged (≥1 week) severe neutropenia and Grade 3 or 4 thrombocytopenia or anemia can occur with ADCETRIS. Febrile neutropenia has been reported with ADCETRIS. Monitor complete blood counts prior to each ADCETRIS dose. Consider more frequent monitoring for patients with Grade 3 or 4 neutropenia. Monitor patients for fever. If Grade 3 or 4 neutropenia develops, consider dose delays, reductions, discontinuation, or G-CSF prophylaxis with subsequent doses.

Serious infections and opportunistic infections: Infections such as pneumonia, bacteremia, and sepsis or septic shock (including fatal outcomes) have been reported in ADCETRIS-treated patients. Closely monitor patients during treatment for bacterial, fungal, or viral infections.

Tumor lysis syndrome: Closely monitor patients with rapidly proliferating tumor and high tumor burden.

Increased toxicity in the presence of severe renal impairment: The frequency of ≥Grade 3 adverse reactions and deaths was greater in patients with severe renal impairment compared to patients with normal renal function. Avoid use in patients with severe renal impairment.

Increased toxicity in the presence of moderate or severe hepatic impairment: The frequency of ≥Grade 3 adverse reactions and deaths was greater in patients with moderate or severe hepatic impairment compared to patients with normal hepatic function. Avoid use in patients with moderate or severe hepatic impairment.

Hepatotoxicity: Serious cases, including fatal outcomes, have occurred in ADCETRIS-treated patients. Cases were consistent with hepatocellular injury, including elevations of transaminases and/or bilirubin, and occurred after the first ADCETRIS dose or rechallenge. Preexisting liver disease, elevated baseline liver enzymes, and concomitant medications may increase the risk. Monitor liver enzymes and bilirubin. Patients with new, worsening, or recurrent hepatotoxicity may require a delay, change in dose, or discontinuation of ADCETRIS.

PML: JC virus infection resulting in PML and death has been reported in ADCETRIS-treated patients. First onset of symptoms occurred at various times from initiation of ADCETRIS therapy, with some cases occurring within 3 months of initial exposure. Other possible contributory factors other than ADCETRIS include prior therapies and underlying disease that may cause immunosuppression. Consider PML diagnosis in patients with new-onset signs and symptoms of central nervous system abnormalities. Hold ADCETRIS if PML is suspected and discontinue ADCETRIS if PML is confirmed.

Pulmonary toxicity: Noninfectious pulmonary toxicity events including pneumonitis, interstitial lung disease, and acute respiratory distress syndrome, some with fatal outcomes, have been reported. Monitor patients for signs and symptoms, including cough and dyspnea. In the event of new or worsening pulmonary symptoms, hold ADCETRIS dosing during evaluation and until symptomatic improvement.

Serious dermatologic reactions: Stevens-Johnson syndrome (SJS) and toxic epidermal necrolysis (TEN), including fatal outcomes, have been reported with ADCETRIS. If SJS or TEN occurs, discontinue ADCETRIS and administer appropriate medical therapy.

Gastrointestinal (GI) complications: Acute pancreatitis, including fatal outcomes, has been reported in ADCETRIS-treated patients. Other fatal and serious GI complications, including perforation, hemorrhage, erosion, ulcer, intestinal obstruction, enterocolitis, neutropenic colitis, and ileus have been reported in ADCETRIS-treated patients. Lymphoma with preexisting GI involvement may increase the risk of perforation. In the event of new or worsening GI symptoms, perform a prompt diagnostic evaluation and treat appropriately.

Embryo-fetal toxicity: Based on the mechanism of action and animal studies, ADCETRIS can cause fetal harm. Advise females of reproductive potential of the potential risk to the fetus, and to avoid pregnancy during ADCETRIS treatment and for at least 6 months after the final dose of ADCETRIS. Most Common (≥20%) Adverse Reactions: peripheral sensory neuropathy, fatigue, nausea, diarrhea, neutropenia, upper respiratory tract infection, and pyrexia.

Drug Interactions
Concomitant use of strong CYP3A4 inhibitors or inducers, or P-gp inhibitors, has the potential to affect the exposure to monomethyl auristatin E (MMAE).

Use in Specific Populations
Moderate or severe hepatic impairment or severe renal impairment: MMAE exposure and adverse reactions are increased. Avoid use.

Advise males with female sexual partners of reproductive potential to use effective contraception during, and for at least 6 months after the final dose of ADCETRIS treatment.

Advise patients to report pregnancy immediately and avoid breastfeeding while receiving ADCETRIS.

For additional Important Safety Information, including BOXED WARNING, please see the full Prescribing Information for ADCETRIS at  www.seattlegenetics.com or  www.ADCETRIS.com .

About ICLUSIG ® (ponatinib) tablets

ICLUSIG is a kinase inhibitor primarily targeting BCR-ABL1, an abnormal tyrosine kinase that is expressed in chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) and Philadelphia-chromosome positive acute lymphoblastic leukemia (Ph+ ALL). ICLUSIG is a targeted cancer medicine developed using a computational and structure-based drug-design platform, specifically designed to inhibit the activity of BCR-ABL1 and its mutations. ICLUSIG targets native BCR-ABL1, as well as BCR-ABL1 treatment-resistant mutations, including the most resistant T315I mutation. ICLUSIG is the only approved TKI that demonstrates activity against the T315I gatekeeper mutation of BCR-ABL1. This mutation has been associated with resistance to all other approved TKIs. ICLUSIG which received full approval from the FDA in November 2016, is also approved in the EU, Australia, Switzerland, Israel, Canada and Japan.

In the U.S., ICLUSIG is indicated for:

  • Treatment of adult patients with chronic-phase, accelerated-phase or blast-phase CML (CP-CML, AP-CML or BP-CML) or Ph+ ALL for whom no other tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) therapy is indicated.
  • Treatment for adult patients with T315I-positive CML (CP, AP or BP) or T315I-positive Ph+ ALL.

Limitations of Use: ICLUSIG is not indicated and is not recommended for the treatment of patients with newly diagnosed CP-CML.

ICLUSIG (ponatinib) IMPORTANT SAFETY INFORMATION (U.S.)

WARNING: ARTERIAL OCCLUSION, VENOUS THROMBOEMBOLISM, HEART FAILURE, and HEPATOTOXICITY

See full prescribing information for complete boxed warning.

  • Arterial occlusion has occurred in at least 35% of ICLUSIG® (ponatinib)-treated patients including fatal myocardial infarction, stroke, stenosis of large arterial vessels of the brain, severe peripheral vascular disease, and the need for urgent revascularization procedures. Patients with and without cardiovascular risk factors, including patients less than 50 years old, experienced these events. Interrupt or stop ICLUSIG immediately for arterial occlusion. A benefit-risk consideration should guide a decision to restart ICLUSIG.
  • Venous Thromboembolism has occurred in 6% of ICLUSIG-treated patients. Monitor for evidence of thromboembolism. Consider dose modification or discontinuation of ICLUSIG in patients who develop serious venous thromboembolism.
  • Heart Failure, including fatalities occurred in 9% of ICLUSIG treated patients. Monitor cardiac function. Interrupt or stop ICLUSIG for new or worsening heart failure.
  • Hepatotoxicity, liver failure and death have occurred in ICLUSIG-treated patients. Monitor hepatic function. Interrupt ICLUSIG if hepatotoxicity is suspected.

WARNINGS AND PRECAUTIONS
Arterial Occlusions: Arterial occlusions, including fatal myocardial infarction, stroke, stenosis of large arterial vessels of the brain, severe peripheral vascular disease have occurred in at least 35% of ICLUSIG-treated patients from the phase 1 and phase 2 trials. In the phase 2 trial, 33% (150/449) of ICLUSIG-treated patients experienced a cardiac vascular (21%), peripheral vascular (12%), or cerebrovascular (9%) arterial occlusive event; some patients experienced more than 1 type of event. Fatal and life-threatening events have occurred within 2 weeks of starting treatment, with doses as low as 15 mg per day. ICLUSIG can also cause recurrent or multi-site vascular occlusion. Patients have required revascularization procedures. The median time to onset of the first cardiac vascular, cerebrovascular, and peripheral vascular arterial occlusive events was 193, 526, and 478 days, respectively. Patients with and without cardiovascular risk factors, some age 50 years or younger, experienced these events. The most common risk factors observed with these events were hypertension, hyperlipidemia, and history of cardiac disease. Arterial occlusive events were more frequent with increasing age and in patients with a history of ischemia, hypertension, diabetes, or hyperlipidemia. In patients suspected of developing arterial occlusive events, interrupt or stop ICLUSIG.

Venous Thromboembolism: Venous thromboembolic events occurred in 6% (25/449) of ICLUSIG-treated patients with an incidence rate of 5% (13/270 CP-CML), 4% (3/85 AP-CML), 10% (6/62 BP-CML) and 9% (3/32 Ph+ ALL). Events included: deep venous thrombosis, pulmonary embolism, superficial thrombophlebitis, and retinal vein thrombosis with vision loss. Consider dose modification or discontinuation of ICLUSIG in patients who develop serious venous thromboembolism.

Heart Failure: Fatal or serious heart failure or left ventricular dysfunction occurred in 6% of ICLUSIG-treated patients (29/449). Nine percent of patients (39/449) experienced any grade of heart failure or left ventricular dysfunction. The most frequently reported heart failure events were congestive cardiac failure and decreased ejection fraction (14 patients each; 3%). Monitor patients for signs or symptoms consistent with heart failure and treat as clinically indicated, including interruption of ICLUSIG. Consider discontinuation if serious heart failure develops.

Hepatotoxicity: ICLUSIG can cause hepatotoxicity, including liver failure and death. Fulminant hepatic failure leading to death occurred in a patient within one week of starting ICLUSIG. Two additional fatal cases of acute liver failure also occurred. The fatal cases occurred in patients with BP-CML or Ph+ ALL. Severe hepatotoxicity occurred in all disease cohorts, with 11% (50/449) experiencing grade 3 or 4 hepatotoxicity. The most common forms of hepatotoxicity were elevations of AST or ALT (54% all grades, 8% grade 3 or 4, 5% not reversed at last follow-up), bilirubin, and alkaline phosphatase. Hepatotoxic events were observed in 29% of patients. The median time to onset of hepatotoxicity event was 3 months. Monitor liver function tests at baseline, then at least monthly or as clinically indicated. Interrupt, reduce or discontinue ICLUSIG as clinically indicated.

Hypertension: Treatment-emergent elevation of systolic or diastolic blood pressure (BP) occurred in 68% (306/449) of ICLUSIG-treated patients. Fifty-three patients (12%) experienced treatment-emergent symptomatic hypertension as a serious adverse reaction, including hypertensive crisis. Patients may require urgent clinical intervention for hypertension associated with confusion, headache, chest pain, or shortness of breath. In patients with baseline systolic BP<140 mm Hg and baseline diastolic BP<90 mm Hg, 80% (229/285) experienced treatment-emergent hypertension; 44% (124/285) developed Stage 1 hypertension, 37% developed Stage 2 hypertension. In 132 patients with Stage 1 hypertension at baseline, 67% (88/132) developed Stage 2 hypertension. Monitor and manage blood pressure elevations during ICLUSIG use and treat hypertension to normalize blood pressure. Interrupt, dose reduce, or stop ICLUSIG if hypertension is not medically controlled. In the event of significant worsening, labile or treatment-resistant hypertension, interrupt treatment and consider evaluating for renal artery stenosis.

Pancreatitis: Pancreatitis occurred in 7% (31/449, 6% serious or grade 3/4) of ICLUSIG-treated patients. The incidence of treatment-emergent lipase elevation was 42% (16% grade 3 or greater). Pancreatitis resulted in discontinuation or treatment interruption in 6% of patients (26/449). The median time to onset of pancreatitis was 14 days. Twenty-three of the 31 cases of pancreatitis resolved within 2 weeks with dose interruption or reduction. Check serum lipase every 2 weeks for the first 2 months and then monthly thereafter or as clinically indicated. Consider additional serum lipase monitoring in patients with a history of pancreatitis or alcohol abuse. Dose interruption or reduction may be required. In cases where lipase elevations are accompanied by abdominal symptoms, interrupt treatment with ICLUSIG and evaluate patients for pancreatitis. Do not consider restarting ICLUSIG until patients have complete resolution of symptoms and lipase levels are less than 1.5 x ULN.

Increased Toxicity in Newly Diagnosed Chronic Phase CML: In a prospective randomized clinical trial in the first-line treatment of newly diagnosed patients with chronic phase (CP) CML, single agent ICLUSIG 45 mg once-daily increased the risk of serious adverse reactions 2-fold compared to single agent imatinib 400 mg once-daily. The median exposure to treatment was less than 6 months. The trial was halted for safety in October 2013. Arterial and venous thrombosis and occlusions occurred at least twice as frequently in the ICLUSIG arm compared to the imatinib arm. Compared to imatinib-treated patients, ICLUSIG-treated patients exhibited a greater incidence of myelosuppression, pancreatitis, hepatotoxicity, cardiac failure, hypertension, and skin and subcutaneous tissue disorders. ICLUSIG is not indicated and is not recommended for the treatment of patients with newly diagnosed CP-CML.

Neuropathy: Peripheral and cranial neuropathy have occurred in ICLUSIG-treated patients. Overall, 20% (90/449) of ICLUSIG-treated patients experienced a peripheral neuropathy event of any grade (2%, grade 3/4). The most common peripheral neuropathies reported were paresthesia (5%, 23/449), neuropathy peripheral (4%, 19/449), hypoesthesia (3%, 15/449), dysgeusia (2%, 10/449), muscular weakness (2%, 10/449) and hyperesthesia (1%, 5/449). Cranial neuropathy developed in 2% (10/449) of ICLUSIG-treated patients (<1%, 3/449 - grade 3/4). Of the patients who developed neuropathy, 26% (23/90) developed neuropathy during the first month of treatment. Monitor patients for symptoms of neuropathy, such as hypoesthesia, hyperesthesia, paresthesia, discomfort, a burning sensation, neuropathic pain or weakness. Consider interrupting ICLUSIG and evaluate if neuropathy is suspected.

Ocular Toxicity: Serious ocular toxicities leading to blindness or blurred vision have occurred in ICLUSIG-treated patients. Retinal toxicities including macular edema, retinal vein occlusion, and retinal hemorrhage occurred in 2% of ICLUSIG-treated patients. Conjunctival irritation, corneal erosion or abrasion, dry eye, conjunctivitis, conjunctival hemorrhage, hyperaemia and edema or eye pain occurred in 14% of patients. Visual blurring occurred in 6% of patients. Other ocular toxicities include cataracts, periorbital edema, blepharitis, glaucoma, eyelid edema, ocular hyperaemia, iritis, iridocyclitis, and ulcerative keratitis. Conduct comprehensive eye exams at baseline and periodically during treatment.

Hemorrhage: Serious hemorrhage events including fatalities, occurred in 6% (28/449) of patients treated with ICLUSIG. Hemorrhage occurred in 28% (124/449) of patients. The incidence of serious bleeding events was higher in patients with AP-CML, BP-CML, and Ph+ ALL. Gastrointestinal hemorrhage and subdural hematoma were the most commonly reported serious bleeding events occurring in 1% (4/449) each. Most hemorrhagic events, but not all, occurred in patients with grade 4 thrombocytopenia. Interrupt ICLUSIG for serious or severe hemorrhage and evaluate.

Fluid Retention: Fluid retention events judged as serious occurred in 4% (18/449) of patients treated with ICLUSIG. One instance of brain edema was fatal. For fluid retention events occurring in >2% of the patients (treatment-emergent), serious cases included: pleural effusion (7/449, 2%), pericardial effusion (4/449, 1%), and edema peripheral (2/449, <1%).

In total, fluid retention occurred in 31% of the patients. The most common fluid retention events were peripheral edema (17%), pleural effusion (8%), pericardial effusion (4%) and peripheral swelling (3%).

Monitor patients for fluid retention and manage patients as clinically indicated. Interrupt, reduce, or discontinue ICLUSIG as clinically indicated.

Cardiac Arrhythmias: Arrhythmias occurred in 19% (86/449) of ICLUSIG-treated patients, of which 7% (33/449) were grade 3 or greater. Arrhythmia of ventricular origin was reported in 3% (3/86) of all arrhythmias, with one case being grade 3 or greater. Symptomatic bradyarrhythmias that led to pacemaker implantation occurred in 1% (3/449) of ICLUSIG-treated patients.

Atrial fibrillation was the most common arrhythmia and occurred in 7% (31/449) of patients, approximately half of which were grade 3 or 4. Other grade 3 or 4 arrhythmia events included syncope (9 patients; 2.0%), tachycardia and bradycardia (2 patients each 0.4%), and electrocardiogram QT prolonged, atrial flutter, supraventricular tachycardia, ventricular tachycardia, atrial tachycardia, atrioventricular block complete, cardio-respiratory arrest, loss of consciousness, and sinus node dysfunction (1 patient each 0.2%). For 27 patients, the event led to hospitalization.

In patients with signs and symptoms suggestive of slow heart rate (fainting, dizziness) or rapid heart rate (chest pain, palpitations or dizziness), interrupt ICLUSIG and evaluate.

Myelosuppression: Myelosuppression was reported as an adverse reaction in 59% (266/449) of ICLUSIG-treated patients and grade 3/4 myelosuppression occurred in 50% (226/449) of patients. The incidence of these events was greater in patients with AP-CML, BP-CML, and Ph+ ALL than in patients with CP-CML.

Severe myelosuppression (Grade 3 or 4) was observed early in treatment, with a median onset time of 1 month (range <1-40 months). Obtain complete blood counts every 2 weeks for the first 3 months and then monthly or as clinically indicated, and adjust the dose as recommended.

Tumor Lysis Syndrome: Two patients (<1%, one with AP-CML and one with BP-CML) treated with ICLUSIG developed serious tumor lysis syndrome. Hyperuricemia occurred in 7% (31/449) of patients. Due to the potential for tumor lysis syndrome in patients with advanced disease, ensure adequate hydration and treat high uric acid levels prior to initiating therapy with ICLUSIG.

Reversible Posterior Leukoencephalopathy Syndrome (RPLS): Postmarketing cases of reversible posterior leukoencephalopathy syndrome (RPLS—also known as Posterior Reversible Encephalopathy Syndrome (PRES)) have been reported in ICLUSIG-treated patients. RPLS is a neurological disorder that can present with signs and symptoms such as seizure, headache, decreased alertness, altered mental functioning, vision loss, and other visual and neurological disturbances. Hypertension is often present and diagnosis is made with supportive findings on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the brain. If RPLS is diagnosed, interrupt ICLUSIG treatment and resume treatment only once the event is resolved and if the benefit of continued treatment outweighs the risk of RPLS.

Compromised Wound Healing and Gastrointestinal Perforation: Since ICLUSIG may compromise wound healing, interrupt ICLUSIG for at least 1 week prior to major surgery. Serious gastrointestinal perforation (fistula) occurred in one patient 38 days post-cholecystectomy.

Embryo-Fetal Toxicity: Based on its mechanism of action and findings from animal studies, ICLUSIG can cause fetal harm when administered to a pregnant woman. In animal reproduction studies, oral administration of ponatinib to pregnant rats during organogenesis caused adverse developmental effects at exposures lower than human exposures at the recommended human dose. Advise pregnant women of the potential risk to the fetus. Advise females of reproductive potential to use effective contraception during treatment with ICLUSIG and for 3 weeks after the last dose.

ADVERSE REACTIONS
Most Common Adverse Reactions: Overall, the most common non-hematologic adverse reactions (≥20%) were abdominal pain, rash, constipation, headache, dry skin, arterial occlusion, fatigue, hypertension, pyrexia, arthralgia, nausea, diarrhea, lipase increased, vomiting, myalgia and pain in extremity. Hematologic adverse reactions included thrombocytopenia, anemia, neutropenia, lymphopenia, and leukopenia.

To report SUSPECTED ADVERSE REACTIONS, contact Takeda at 1-844-T-1POINT (1-844-817-6468) or FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088 or www.fda.gov/medwatch .

DRUG INTERACTIONS
Strong CYP3A Inhibitors: Avoid concurrent use or reduce ICLUSIG dose if co-administration cannot be avoided.
Strong CYP3A Inducers: Avoid concurrent use.

Use in Specific Populations
Females and Males of Reproductive Potential: ICLUSIG can cause fetal harm when administered to pregnant women. Advise females to use effective contraception during treatment with ICLUSIG and for 3 weeks after the last dose. Ponatinib may impair fertility in females and it is not known if these effects are reversible. Verify pregnancy status of females of reproductive potential prior to initiating ICLUSIG.

Lactation: Advise women not to breastfeed during treatment with ICLUSIG and for six days after last dose.

For US Prescribing Information:  http://www.iclusig.com/pi

About NINLARO™ (ixazomib) capsules

NINLARO™ (ixazomib) is an oral proteasome inhibitor which is also being studied across the continuum of multiple myeloma treatment settings as well as systemic light-chain (AL) amyloidosis. It was the first oral proteasome inhibitor to enter Phase 3 clinical trials and to receive approval. NINLARO was approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) in November 2015 following a priority review and by the European Commission in November 2016. In the U.S. and Europe, NINLARO is indicated in combination with lenalidomide and dexamethasone for the treatment of patients with multiple myeloma who have received at least one prior therapy. NINLARO has received marketing authorization by regulatory authorities in more than 55 countries.

Ixazomib was granted orphan drug designation in multiple myeloma in both the U.S. and Europe in 2011 and for AL amyloidosis in both the U.S. and Europe in 2012. Ixazomib received Breakthrough Therapy status by the U.S. FDA for relapsed or refractory systemic light-chain (AL) amyloidosis, a related ultra orphan disease, in 2014. The Japanese Ministry of Health, Labour and Welfare granted Orphan Drug designation to ixazomib in 2016.

The comprehensive ixazomib clinical development program, TOURMALINE, includes a total of six ongoing pivotal trials – five, which together are investigating every major multiple myeloma patient population, and one in light-chain amyloidosis:

  • TOURMALINE-MM1, investigating ixazomib vs. placebo in combination with lenalidomide and dexamethasone in relapsed and/or refractory multiple myeloma
  • TOURMALINE-MM2, investigating ixazomib vs. placebo in combination with lenalidomide and dexamethasone in patients with newly diagnosed multiple myeloma
  • TOURMALINE-MM3, investigating ixazomib vs. placebo as maintenance therapy in patients with newly diagnosed multiple myeloma following induction therapy and autologous stem cell transplant (ASCT)
  • TOURMALINE-MM4, investigating ixazomib vs. placebo as maintenance therapy in patients with newly diagnosed multiple myeloma who have not undergone ASCT; this study is currently enrolling
  • TOURMALINE-MM5, investigating ixazomib plus dexamethasone vs. pomalidomide plus dexamethasone in patients with relapsed and/or refractory multiple myeloma who have become resistant to lenalidomide
  • TOURMALINE-AL1, investigating ixazomib plus dexamethasone vs. physician choice of selected regimens in patients with relapsed or refractory AL amyloidosis; this study is currently enrolling

For more information about actively enrolling Phase 3 studies please visit: https://www.tourmalinetrials.com/

In addition to the TOURMALINE program, ixazomib is being evaluated in multiple therapeutic combinations for various patient populations in investigator initiated studies globally.

NINLARO™ (ixazomib) capsules: Global Important Safety Information

SPECIAL WARNINGS AND PRECAUTIONS
Thrombocytopenia has been reported with NINLARO (28% vs. 14% in the NINLARO and placebo regimens, respectively) with platelet nadirs typically occurring between Days 14-21 of each 28-day cycle and recovery to baseline by the start of the next cycle. It did not result in an increase in hemorrhagic events or platelet transfusions. Monitor platelet counts at least monthly during treatment with NINLARO and consider more frequent monitoring during the first three cycles. Manage with dose modifications and platelet transfusions as per standard medical guidelines.

Gastrointestinal toxicities have been reported in the NINLARO and placebo regimens respectively, such as diarrhea (42% vs. 36%), constipation (34% vs. 25%), nausea (26% vs. 21%), and vomiting (22% vs. 11%), occasionally requiring use of antiemetic and anti-diarrheal medications, and supportive care.

Peripheral neuropathy was reported with NINLARO (28% vs. 21% in the NINLARO and placebo regimens, respectively). The most commonly reported reaction was peripheral sensory neuropathy (19% and 14% in the NINLARO and placebo regimens, respectively). Peripheral motor neuropathy was not commonly reported in either regimen (< 1%). Monitor patients for symptoms of peripheral neuropathy and adjust dosing as needed.

Peripheral edema was reported with NINLARO (25% vs. 18% in the NINLARO and placebo regimens, respectively). Evaluate patients for underlying causes and provide supportive care, as necessary. Adjust the dose of dexamethasone per its prescribing information or the dose of NINLARO for severe symptoms.

Cutaneous reactions occurred in 19% of patients in the NINLARO regimen compared to 11% of patients in the placebo regimen. The most common type of rash reported in both regimens was maculo-papular and macular rash. Manage rash with supportive care, dose modification or discontinuation.

Hepatotoxicity, drug-induced liver injury, hepatocellular injury, hepatic steatosis, and hepatitis cholestatic have been uncommonly reported with NINLARO. Monitor hepatic enzymes regularly and adjust dose for Grade 3 or 4 symptoms.

Pregnancy- NINLARO can cause fetal harm. Advise male and females patients of reproductive potential to use contraceptive measures during treatment and for an additional 90 days after the final dose of NINLARO. Women of childbearing potential should avoid becoming pregnant while taking NINLARO due to potential hazard to the fetus. Women using hormonal contraceptives should use an additional barrier method of contraception.

Lactation- It is not known whether NINLARO or its metabolites are excreted in human milk. There could be potential adverse events in nursing infants and therefore breastfeeding should be discontinued.

SPECIAL PATIENT POPULATIONS
Hepatic Impairment: Reduce the NINLARO starting dose to 3 mg in patients with moderate or severe hepatic impairment.

Renal Impairment: Reduce the NINLARO starting dose to 3 mg in patients with severe renal impairment or end-stage renal disease (ESRD) requiring dialysis. NINLARO is not dialyzable and, therefore, can be administered without regard to the timing of dialysis.

DRUG INTERACTIONS
Co-administration of strong CYP3A inducers with NINLARO is not recommended.

ADVERSE REACTIONS
The most frequently reported adverse reactions (≥ 20%) in the NINLARO regimen, and greater than in the placebo regimen, were diarrhea (42% vs. 36%), constipation (34% vs. 25%), thrombocytopenia (28% vs. 14%), peripheral neuropathy (28% vs. 21%), nausea (26% vs. 21%), peripheral edema (25% vs. 18%), vomiting (22% vs. 11%), and back pain (21% vs. 16%). Serious adverse reactions reported in ≥ 2% of patients included thrombocytopenia (2%) and diarrhea (2%). For each adverse reaction, one or more of the three drugs was discontinued in ≤ 1% of patients in the NINLARO regimen.

For European Union Summary of Product Characteristics: http://www.ema.europa.eu/docs/en_GB/document_library/EPAR_-Product_Information/human/003844/WC500217620.pdf
For US Prescribing Information: https://www.ninlarohcp.com/pdf/prescribing-information.pdf
For Canada Product Monograph: http://www.takedacanada.com/ninlaropm

About Takeda Pharmaceutical Company

Takeda Pharmaceutical Company Limited (TSE: 4502) is a global, research and development-driven pharmaceutical company committed to bringing better health and a brighter future to patients by translating science into life-changing medicines. Takeda focuses its R&D efforts on oncology, gastroenterology and neuroscience therapeutic areas plus vaccines. Takeda conducts R&D both internally and with partners to stay at the leading edge of innovation. Innovative products, especially in oncology and gastroenterology, as well as Takeda’s presence in emerging markets, are currently fueling the growth of Takeda. Approximately 30,000 Takeda employees are committed to improving quality of life for patients, working with Takeda’s partners in health care in more than 70 countries.

For more information, visit https://www.takeda.com/newsroom/.

Additional information about Takeda is available through its corporate website, www.takeda.com, and additional information about Takeda Oncology, the brand for the global oncology business unit of Takeda Pharmaceutical Company Limited, is available through its website, www.takedaoncology.com.

Contact information

Takeda Pharmaceutical Company Limited
Japanese Media
Kazumi Kobayashi, +81 (0) 3-3278-2095
kazumi.kobayashi@takeda.com
or
Media outside Japan
Victoria von Rinteln, +1-617-444-4391
victoria.vonrinteln@takeda.com

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